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Finding the Picture with Brooks Jensen

FTP-035
Finding the Invitation

Here is an interesting place. I photographed it — wide angle lens, get it all in. This composition does give me a visual sense of the place, but not a feeling of the place. It's a bit too "commercial" to be emotionally charged. At least that's how I interpret the rather factual and static view in this photograph. I knew I wanted something more heartfelt. Looking around the room for something simpler that would evoke and emotion, I decided the room felt nostalgic, old, quaint. I looked for something that would say something about time.

I found it and thought I had a "keeper." Not bad, but it just didn't grab me like I had hoped. Still a bit sterile and object-oriented. Pictures of things. I have them by the bucketful, but it's not particularly evocative. I knew there was something here, but I also knew I hadn't found it yet.

I decided to stew on it a bit. I walked over to the chair next to the window and sat down to let things percolate for a few minutes. I picked up a book and thumbed throught it casually. I stared out the window to the garden below. I began to daydream a bit, completely forgetting about the photography I was attempting. And then it struck me. Sitting there, the space, the garden, the books. This place was intended to be a bit of a sanctuary for his guests. A place of calm, a place of comfort. It was inviting. In fact, I was sitting in it. At last, with enough time, I had found the photograph that would invite a viewer into the space. I would love to spend a week there, with Dickens, and coffee, and that blanket on my lap.

Tech data:

Panasonic G85 using a Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 lens at 21mm. ISO 3200. f/9.0 at 1/40th sec.